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Wednesday, July 8, 2020 | History

2 edition of ILL - Sugar plantations in the formation of Brazilian society found in the catalog.

ILL - Sugar plantations in the formation of Brazilian society

Stuart Schwartz

ILL - Sugar plantations in the formation of Brazilian society

by Stuart Schwartz

  • 48 Want to read
  • 17 Currently reading

Published .
Written in English


ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL20265247M

  Plantations were the classic crucible for Brazil's quilombos, with slave rebellions frequent and Maroons organizing or becoming directly involved in further plantation uprisings. Although the precise details remain obscure, Palmares itself was originally created in the late 16(th) century by rebellious slaves from a large sugar plantation near. Portugal used Brazil as a place to produce massive amounts of sugar on places called plantations and used force labor in this case the enslavement of Africans and originally the Amerindians but.

  This essay looks at the historical geography of sugar plantations in Northeast Brazil during the 16th- and 17th-centuries to critique the spatio-temporality of the discourse of the Anthropocene. I argue that sugar plantations were key places in early systemic cycles of capital accumulation with their grim calculus of cheap labor-power and Author: Joshua R. Eichen. The Bahian Conspiracy, also known as Revolt of the Tailors (after the trade of many of the leaders) and recently also called Revolt of Buzios, was a late eighteenth century slave rebellion in the then Captaincy of Bahia, in the State of the Inconfidência Mineira of , it was a separatist movement with a popular base and extensive black participation.

Plantation Agriculture and Social Control in Northern Peru, By Michael J. Gonzales This study, based primarily on previously unavailable private records of sugarcane plantations, examines the external and internal dynamics of the sugar industry. Brazil - Brazil - Agriculture and prospecting: Brazil’s society and economy were based on agriculture and mining, especially the export-oriented production of sugar and gold. The sugar industry, confined primarily to the Northeast, was the principal source of Brazilian wealth from the 16th to the 18th century, and it provided the crown with most of its revenue through the time of independence.


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ILL - Sugar plantations in the formation of Brazilian society by Stuart Schwartz Download PDF EPUB FB2

Sugar Plantations in the Formation of Brazilian Society: Bahia, – (Cambridge Latin American Studies) Edition UnstatedCited by: 'Sugar Plantation is a major contribution to our efforts to understand Bahia and its sugar and slaveholding system.

It is required readin not only for specialists in Brazilian history, but for anyone interested in the question of slavery and race relations in the Americas.' Francis A. Dutra Source: Hispanic American Historical ReviewCited by:   Sugar Plantations in the Formation of Brazilian Society: Bahia, This study examines the history of the sugar economy and the peculiar development of plantation society over a three hundred year period in Bahia, a major sugar plantation zone and an important terminus of the Atlantic slave trade/5.

As Stuart Schwartz points out, for Wallerstein slavery is possible on sugar plantations because these call for crude gang labour. Schwartz shows in his excellent monograph on the sugar society of Bahia between that plantation slavery proved less rigid than its interpreters, like Wallerstein, have often made of it.

Plantation slavery in Bahia. Publication Information The main body of the Publication Information page contains all the metadata that HRAF holds for that document. Author: Author's name as listed in Library of Congress records Schwartz, Stuart B.

Title: Sugar plantations in the formation of Brazilian society: Bahia, Published By: Original publisher Cambridge ; New York: Cambridge University Press.

xxiii, p. ill. Up to this point, we have traced the formation of colonial Brazilian society through the sugar economy and the plantation system on which it was based. During this formative experience, actions and decisions by Europeans, Indians, and Africans contributed to the way in which the historical process took place and the results to which it led.

out of 5 stars Sugar Plantations in the Formation of Brazilian Society. Reviewed in the United States on Janu Format: Paperback Verified Purchase. I ordered this book, which was fulfilled by Amazon and described as used-acceptable.

Sugar Plantations in the Formation of Brazilian Society: Bahia, – (Cambridge Latin. Cambridge University Press - Sugar Plantations in the Formation of Brazilian Society: Bahia, - Stuart B. Schwartz Index Cambridge University Press - Sugar Plantations in the Formation of Brazilian Society: Bahia, - Stuart B.

Sugar Plantations in the Formation of Brazilian Society: Bahia, (Cambridge Latin American Studies) by Schwartz, Stuart B. and a great selection of related books, art and collectibles available now at   Sugar Plantations in the Formation of Brazilian Society by Stuart B.

Schwartz,available at Book Depository with free delivery worldwide.4/5(22). Buy Sugar Plantations in the Formation of Brazilian Society: Bahia, – (Cambridge Latin American Studies) by Schwartz, Stuart (ISBN: ) from Amazon's Book Store. Everyday low prices and free delivery on eligible orders.5/5(2).

Get this from a library. Sugar plantations in the formation of Brazilian society: Bahia, [Stuart B Schwartz] -- This study examines the history of the sugar economy and the peculiar development of plantation society over a three hundred year period in Bahia, a major sugar plantation zone and an important.

All about Sugar Plantations in the Formation of Brazilian Society: Bahia, (Cambridge Latin American Studies) by Stuart B.

Schwartz. LibraryThing is a 3/5. Stuart B. Schwartz, a professor of history and director of the Center for Early Modern History at the University of Minnesota, is the author of Sugar Plantations in the Formation of Brazilian Society, which won the Bolton Prize for the best book in Latin American History.

Get this from a library. Sugar plantations in the formation of Brazilian society: Bahia, [Stuart B Schwartz]. With Sugar Came the Slaves. While the influx of slaves from Africa initially meant low labor costs and increased sugar production, slavery in the eighteenth century on the sugar plantation had other profound effects in the Caribbean too.

It wasn’t long before the largest group in the Caribbean population was these very slaves. An estimated four million people, thirty seven percent of all the captured Africans forced into slavery, were settled in Brazil to work in the sugar plantations and mining industry.

Slavery was the foundation of the Brazilian economy until when slavery was legally : Lauri Lyons. In addition, while this book cannot compete in significance with Schwartz's prize-winning and monumental Sugar Plantations in the Formation of Brazilian Society: Bahia, (), it is substantially more accessible for students and scholars interested in comparative slavery, rather than Brazil.

A vignette-driven popular history. Focuses on sugar production in the Caribbean, the destruction of indigenous people, and the suffering of the Africans who grew the crop. Aykroyd, W. Sweet Malefactor: Sugar, Slavery, and Human Society.

London: Heinemann, E-mail Citation» An overview of sugar plantations in the Caribbean. Written by. Later accounts of Brazil by Dutch travelers and those from Suriname perpetuated the “objective” description of the mechanics of sugar production, focusing on the machine and efficiency, only mentioning slaves as a necessary part of the whole systematic process.

15 The type of mill typically used on sugar plantations had three cylinders. The central cylinder, driven by water or animal. Schwartz's first Bolton-Johnson Prize was awarded to his book Sugar Plantation in the Formation of Brazilian Society ().

Schwartz was a fellow of the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation and the Institute of Advanced Studies in Princeton, New Jersey.Slavery in Brazil: Brazilian Scholars in The colonists who landed in Brazil in to establish sugar cane plantations and mills to process the cane—an enterprise that had been proved successful on the island of Madeira—quickly turned to servile labor to clear and cultivate the land.

owners could be found at every level of society Cited by: 3.Slavery in Brazil: Selected full-text books and articles The Hierarchies of Slavery in Santos, Brazil, By Ian Read Stanford University Press, Read preview Overview.